REES-MOGG TELLS MAY HOW TO FRUSTRATE THE EU WHILE DELIVERING SUPERB POINT AGAINST TALKS WITH CORBYN

CONSERVATIVE MP, JACOB REES-MOGG HAS TOLD THE PRIME MINISTER HOW THE UK SHOULD MAKE LIFE ‘DIFFICULT’ FOR THE EU.

While criticising Mrs Mays’ decision to reach out to the Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn and enter into talks, Jacob Rees-Mogg explained why it would be a good and valid idea to make life ‘difficult for the EU’.

May took the decision to reach out to Jeremy Corbyn overtaking the UK out of the EU on the 12th April with no deal.

Mr Rees-Mogg made a brilliant point on his LBC show this week by explaining that we now have two remain voters negotiating Brexit and no voice for the 17.4 million who voted to leave the EU.

He said (Video below): “It means that two remainers are holding a discussion together and it means there is no spokesmen there for the 17.4 million who voted to leave. It’s essential for people who always wanted to remain, not negotiated well, have been opposed to Brexit, coming together to try and stop Brexit to prevent it happening on the due date.

“By using an extension as a backdoor way to keep us in.”

Mr Rees-Mogg then went onto justify why the UK government should now make life difficult for the EU: “We should be as difficult as possible. The EU has not negotiated with us with sincere cooperation, they’ve tried to split up the country. Its’ tried to divide Northern Ireland from Great Britain – you can’t call that sincere cooperation. It’s insincere and not cooperative.

“If therefore because of their tactics in the negotiation we end up having an extension, then we should use whatever powers we have within the European Union to make life difficult.”

Jacob said live: “We do still have some Remain vetoes but that doesn’t mean that we haven’t ceded very large swathes of power to the European Union.

“If you take the budget, we can veto the Multiannual Financial Framework but we can’t veto the annual budget.

 

“Fortunately, the Multiannual Financial Framework, which lasts for seven years, will be up for discussion in 2020 so if we are still in, in 2020, we would be able to veto it – causing maximum inconvenience to the European Union.”

He added: “The EU sets so many of our laws beyond this where there will be nothing we can do at all.

“We will find the regulatory drift that comes in and affects how we are governed carries on.

 

“That VAT is still under the auspices, good by good, as they are applied in this country we can’t exempt domestic fuel, for example, from VAT.

“Our trade negotiations all handled by the European Union – agriculture and fisheries – all of this is outside our control if we Remain in the European Union.

 

“So, what I am suggesting is we use those remaining vestigial powers to make life difficult for them because they haven’t treated us with the sincere cooperation that they now expect from us.”

Do you agree with Jacob?

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